Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Unexplainable Strangeness



Scott's Tip Of The Day: Sometimes things make no sense. You just have to accept them. Like the youtube video above. It is what it is. A mystery wrapped in an enigma wrapped in another mystery. The only person who seems to grasp the essence of this is youtube user "ScrewLimbBizkit." He poignantly said (in the Top Rated Comments section): "This song is like what you hear when you get aids trying to find the cure for aids and then you find the cure and cure your own aids." Well, how can I argue with that?

9 comments:

Candice said...

What the ever-loving CRAP was that?!?!

Seriously though, I thought the harmonica solo at the end there made that whole video so much classier. And can anyone tell me what language they were using, and what it meant? Maybe I don't want to know...

Jessica said...

This is one of my favorites - someone sent it to me when I was injured and on pain meds.

To answer Candice's question, Adriano Celentano (the singer) is Italian, but the song is total gibberish. I've heard this is what American English sounds like to non-English speakers.

Good fun. Thanks for posting.

Looksie Lovitz said...

bahahaha. that video just blew my mind.

Krystan said...

That was pretty funny. Thanks for the entertainment!

Ayla said...

I am not going to try to under stand that video or my brain would explode...

Star said...

Known as "il Molleggiato" ("the springy one") because of his rubbery and energetic style of dancing while performing, the ever popular Adriano Celentano, was one of Italy's first singers to recognize the new kind of music developing in America in the 1950s, and to introduce it in Italy (think of Elvis Presley's daring moves). This piece, from 1972, became a hit in America (at the 70th place in the lists) before it became a hit in Italy, and parodies a teacher of English and his classroom of students. The text is in non-English, that is, mostly made-up words with English sounds, but with no meaning, just to poke fun at the obsession with English that, rather than waning, has become more pervasive and a sign of snobbery. Since the piece uses half-spoken half-sung text--I'd venture to say perhaps born out of Italy's pervasive operatic influence, though, alas, it's ever waning--Celentano believes that this piece is a precursor to rap. In my opinion, the Italian title of the piece possibly could contain an allusion to a vulgar way of saying in Italian that someone is 'taking one for a ride.' My comments aside, the info--unchecked--is taken from the Italian pages of Wikipedia. Perhaps there is something on him in the English version, too.

Scott said...

Star:

You get a gold star for that.

Brother in a hurry said...

....that was a freakin 'A' grade trip..... siamo i creatori di musica e siamo i sognatori dei sogni

Micci said...

I think I just found my new favorite song.